Fall and Winter 2010 – 2011

NEWSLETTER NO.31

Leaves are turning wonderful reds and golds, the grass is littered with such colorful debris and now it’s time to turn the clocks back. Winter will be upon us all too soon. The temperature is cooler and when Thanksgiving comes we turn on the under-floor heating in the dog houses — just enough to keep the dogs dry but not too hot.

It has been a busy summer with kennels and cat condos full most of the time. The numbers are keeping up and we appreciate all your business. There have been more people asking for tours. Louis and I love meeting all you dog and cat lovers as much as we enjoy showing off our facility and pointing out that it is our excellent staff who do such a great job of providing that “Peace of Mind Care” we all count on.

FIFTEEN YEARS AGO THIS OCTOBER we opened for business. It is hard to believe we’ve been here that long, above the Columbia River and just down from the Sagemoor Hills and those beautiful orchards and farms. We can see the sun rise clear over the eastern rim every morning — provided the clouds are not in the way — and see it set behind Rattlesnake Mountain in the evening. But things have changed during those fifteen years. Trees grown up and roses bloomed. The maples outside the front of the Kennels turn a vivid red at this time. Louis starts to clear out the colorful annuals from the flower beds and clean up the vegetable garden. The Kennels are in need of a paint job and we have just replaced the dishwasher. Age shows!

The big changes during those fifteen years have been that we have all grown older and not just the dishwasher. We have said sad goodbyes to some of our beloved boarders, and to some of their owners too. I look at my corgi Lucy who is now 14, somewhat deaf, and age is showing in her health. I lost my cat Nicholas earlier this year. Our pets are members of our family, as yours are of your families. You allow us the privilege of caring for them when you must be away and they thus become members of our Kennel family. We miss them and grieve their loss, as you do, when they must pass on.

WHO IS THE BOSS?

“Most dog owners are at length able to teach themselves to obey their dog”

Robert Morley 1908

ANOTHER CHANGE

We found it necessary to go to a Deposit system for the really busy times of year — summer vacation, Thanksgiving and Christmas weeks and the weeks around Memorial Day and Labor Day. It has been well received and meant that when pet owners know the dates they need to board their pets, they will be assured of space and we will be assured there will be no last minute cancellations, leaving us with empty kennels. We have appreciated how very timely you have been with sending in deposits and letting us know if there has been a need to cancel.

BUT PLEASE NOTE — ONCE YOU HAVE MADE THAT RESERVATION, CONFIRMED BY YOUR DEPOSIT, THERE CAN BE NO CHANGING DATES ON ANY PART OF THAT RESERVATION.

CHRISTMAS WARNINGS — or do you want overweight and sick pets?

Watch out for tinsel, tree decorations, poinsettias, chocolates and candies in general, all the food and trays of cheese and sausage and cookies, small toys that might be fun for a dog to chew on and a cat to play with and small objects that might find a home in some pet’s stomach and have to be removed only after x-rays and VERY expensive surgeries.

Old English Proverb — “The Cat has nine lives: three for playing, three for straying and three for staying.”

NEW PUPPIES, KITTENS AND RESCUED PETS

Christmas time seems a great time to give a warm wriggly puppy to some child who has said for years “Mummy, Daddy, can I PLEASE have a puppy, or a kitten, for Christmas” and of course you smile and say “We’ll see.” And there it is, a wriggly warm furry ball on Christmas Day. Or you go to the Pet Rescue group, thinking that a rescued pet is like giving twice — once to the rescued dog or cat, and once to your family. It seems such a great idea.

Then you realize that you have also scheduled a skiing vacation in January and this new family addition cannot go along with you. So you call a boarding kennels — such as us. We are delighted to hear about the new family member BUT two things come up.

First — does he or she have all the vaccinations required ? It takes at least sixteen weeks for a new puppy to acquire all the vaccinations both veterinarians and boarding kennels require. Second, has the new family member had time to bond with the family. This second point is important because if this is a rescued pet, being left behind AGAIN can be stressful. Stress can make bonding difficult and interfere with future training.

One final thought. For whom is this new pet intended? Does a child long for this pet and is that child old enough to play safely with a dog or a cat? Will the child have some responsibilities for the animal’s care? Or is it YOU who wants the pet but doesn’t want to say so? Go ahead, if you can do the same things you expect your child to do with this pet, then by all means get it. There are plenty of rewards for you when you include a four-legged family member. Just remember, it is, after all, a dog or a cat, not your offspring. You are responsible for it all its life, and it doesn’t leave home to join the Marines, or go to college, or become a carpenter when its eighteen years old. Though I know several dogs who are the best of mental health therapists.

LET’S US CELEBRATE NOVEMBER 11, 1918 — ARMISTICE DAY.

In 1918 at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month the Great War, or as it is now referred to, the First World War, ended after more than four horrifying years and the pounding, the shelling and the slaughter stopped. When those guns were silenced, there were at least 10,000 dogs at the Front serving as soldiers too. The numbers are impossible to come by, but one source writes that the Allied armies may have had as many as 50,000 trained war dogs and an equivalent number on the other side. About 7,000 died in active service.

Mara Bovsun writes in the American Kennel Club’s “Family Dog” November/December 2010 issue in “K -9s on the Western Front”about the dogs that “carried messages, hauled machine guns, light artillery and carts loaded with ammunition, food, medicine and sometimes wounded soldiers. Small dogs trotted among the trenches, delivering cigarettes and comfort.”

I may be late with this issue of Sagemoor Kennels Newsletter, but I want to recognize those dogs who served in World War I — the first war of the 20th century – and also all subsequent wars.

REMEMBER OUR REGULAR CLIENT SERVICE HOURS

  • Monday — Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

    Check out time is 1 p.m. and pets picked up after 1 p.m, will be charged another night.

  • Saturday 9 a.m. to 12 noon
  • Sunday OPEN EVENINGS ONLY

    Pick Up 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Drop Off 6p.m. to 7 p.m.

    We charge for the full day on Sundays

WE ARE CLOSED ALL DAY THANKSGIVING, CHRISTMAS DAY, NEW YEAR’S DAY AND JULY FOURTH.

Labor Day and Memorial Day fall on Mondays and we are closed all day on those holidays but open 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. just like Sundays and therefore charge for the whole day.

“Cats seem to go on the principle that it never does any harm to ask for what you want.”

Joseph Wood Krutch (1893-19700)

And with that in mind here are some suggestions…

SOME TIPS ON BOARDING YOUR PETS

This is not a complete list, but it will give you something to think about and you can always call us and ask questions — Kathy at 544-9682 or Jenepher at 544-9696.

  • First time boarders and ones that you think might be a bit nervous, bring their bed, if not too large, their own food, an old sweatshirt or t shirt of yours (and don’t wash it first, it needs to have your smell on it.) and some favorite toy — but not new one.
  • Bring a list of the following – where we can actually reach you, where we can reach your back up, what are some of the things you do that your dog or cat loves most, what makes your pet throw-up, get upset with you, things you think your pet hates the most (one owner said her pet didn’t like people wearing black, and I was wearing black at the time), any useful tips that you tell your friends about your pet but feel embarrassed to tell us. You have no idea how useful such information can be.
  • If you are bringing your own food bring enough for two days more than you are going to be away, and same with treats and medicines.
  • If you are bringing meds, bring them in the prescription bottle so we know what we are giving.
  • Any tip that might help your furry friend feel less stressed.
  • Anything you can think of to make yourself less stressed.

GROOMER’S NOTES NOW THAT THE WEATHER IS COLDER AND WETTER

  • Watch for the wet fur around the feet — dry them off and wipe out the mud from between the toes.
  • Same thing for when it’s snowing and there are those frozen clumps of snow between the toes and under the armpits.
  • Brush often — it helps the circulation — both your pet’s and yours

Call Cecilia for that Holiday Pet Hair Do — 544-9682


SAGEMOOR KENNELS LLC

“FOR PEACE OF MIND BOARDING AND QUALITY GROOMING”

7196 COLUMBIA RIVER ROAD

PASCO WA 99301

(509)544-9696)

www.sagemoor.com