Spring and Summer 2010

NEWSLETTER NO.30

Signs of Spring – Louis is training his dogs with the riding lawnmower – they run in front of it and he motors slowly behind them – the mower has the word “TANK” emblazoned on its back – very appropriate. Competition field trials are coming up soon and so Louis is preparing. One of his pointers won first and third places recently, so he’s very excited.

I must admit the weather is barely spring–like, but it may improve. Crocuses and daffodils are up and blooming tentatively. The quiet of the nights has been broken lately by the sound of the wind machines running in the neighboring cherry orchard to protect buds beginning to set on.

It wasn’t a bad winter – better than some in past years even if the temperatures did fall below zero a few times. But we all kept warm, especially the Kennels where the dogs and cats kept toasty warm. And to think they all have fur coats on! The staff who walked the dogs could have done with some of those fur coats.

Daylight savings time starts this weekend and then we know winter is over. It is windy and that means dust – another sign of spring.

A VERY SPECIAL THANK YOU GOES TO LORETTO HULSE OF THE TRI–CITY HERALD FOR HER WONDERFUL ARTICLE ABOUT SAGEMOOR KENNELS AND TO THE PHOTOGRAPHER FOR HIS EXCELLENT PHOTOS AND MANY THANKS TO THE TRI–CITY HERALD FOR THE COVERAGE

Kennel Staff are encouraged to study for the Pet Care Services Association Pet Care Technician exam

CONGRATULATIONS TO AMANDA ERDMAN and PAULA RICCI

Both of these Sagemoor Kennel Staff, studied the text book, took the examination, and passed it with flying colors to become Pet Care Technicians and now they have their diplomas on the wall and their badges on their lapels. They join other staff with this certification.Congratulations to you both.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOUR PET COMES HOME

Your pet will undoubtedly be happy to see you after you have been away. You can expect your pet to be excited. Even though it is wonderful for your pet to be home and see you again, this is a stressful time for your pet – and for you too! Here are some simple steps that will help ease the transition back to home life for all the family.

  • Overexcitement may make a pet pant a lot and act thirsty. Your pet is probably not really thirsty, and had plenty of water available at the Kennels. Give a few ice cubes to tide him over until he settles down.
  • Food. Same thing. Your pet may act as though he has not seen food for a week! Just it’s part of the excitement of seeing you again.
  • BUT please do not feed your pet for at least three hours after arriving home and then limit the food and water you provide until he has settled down.
  • BE AWARE that excessive drinking and eating may lead to digestive upsets and bloating.
  • Walk your pet when you get home or give him a chance to run in your yard area. Excitement may also cause a change in urination or bowel movements outside his normal schedule.
  • Give your pet some personalized attention – some play time, or sitting and petting and brushing will help it get through that excitement stage and calm down.
  • Kennel life can be very exciting and some dogs charge around barking at other dogs and having a wonderful time. These dogs leave the Kennel life exhausted but happy and may sleep a lot the first couple of days they are home.
  • Re–establish home patterns by following your normal schedule. Pets love following a schedule – it makes them feel safe and secure.
  • When you pick your cat up from the Kennel, be sure to keep her – or him – in the house the first few days before allowing time outside. Cats need to find that “at home” feeling again before looking for what’s hiding in the bushes outside.

If you have any concerns about your pet’s behavior when back home, please call us and let us know.

“Even the tiniest Poodle or Chihuahua is still a Wolf at heart.”

Dorothy Hinshaw Patent. Dogs: The Wolf Within

QUESTION – WHEN TO BOARD MY PET?

ANSWER – whenever I need to be away from home or whatever is happening in my life that I need to put this member of my family in a safe, secure place where he or she will have quality care from people who love dogs and cats.

But there are times when boarding your pet may not be the best solution. If your pet has only recently joined your family, is a young puppy or a rescued animal, then they need to spend those important first weeks getting to know you, becoming familiar with your routine, learning who is in charge and what the rules are. We are frequently asked to board a new puppy who has had less than a month in its new home. Usually the puppy has not had a full regimen of vaccinations and we have to decline the boarding, but even so, it is still too young to manage the changes boarding would mean. Rescued pets too need time with their new owners because boarding is too much like being left – or dumped – once again. Call us – we are happy to suggest alternatives

A WORD FROM YOUR GROOMER – OR “ CECILIA SAYS……….”

Your puppy’s first grooming – and perhaps the first two – can be difficult times for puppies. They are coming to a new strange place, meeting a new person who wants to not only pet them but also perhaps cut off some of their precious fur that has still not grown into grown–up fur. Cecilia is happy to talk with owners about these first grooming occasions. She suggests that you talk with her first and above all, not to expect too much. She is more interested in making sure the youngster is not upset by the whole experience. She suggests that you spend time each day stroking your puppy’s legs, holding the feet and stroking those toes. If the puppy wants to just turn over and lie on the back then go ahead and give a good tummy rub and while you are doing this, you can run your hands up and down the legs, giving the toes a slight squeeze.

Dr. Shaw, from the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University recommends that regular bathing and grooming shouldn’t start until your puppy is 16 to 20 weeks old. “Their coat isn’t developed to the point they need routine grooming.” If your puppy gets dirty he suggests a good alternative to bathing is to let the dirt dry and then brushing is the most effective.

The same thing goes for bigger dogs that you have rescued. The grooming experience may be a very new thing to them and they need some reassurance. Some of them have had unpleasant experiences before coming to your good care and they will still remember those times.

PLEASE NOTE that we are requiring confirmation of current RABIES VACCINATIONS on all dogs before we will schedule a grooming appointment.

NEW CLIENTS – “DROPPING OFF” YOUR PET TAKES TIME.

It’s like leaving your child at daycare or kindergarten for the first time – perhaps a bit worse because these four legged family members can’t talk. At least they do, but we’re not quite sure what they’re saying. Well, sometimes your five year old doesn’t know what to say either if you are at all tearful about saying goodbye at the classroom door.

So we try to make it as painless as possible. First of all, allow plenty of time so that we can do all the talking necessary. That means, giving your pet that farewell pat in the front office because we don’t allow owners to come back into the kennel area – not even the first time, not even to arrange the bedding and set the toy in the right corner! Just tell us and we can do that – it’s our job.

So while a staff person is introducing your pet to his or her new quarters where there will already be a bowl of fresh water waiting, we want you to read the reservation and boarding agreement form – it’s got two sides – and sign or initial where marked, making sure to ask any questions if you don’t understand some point. It’s a help if you have already made a list of feeding instructions, any medication instructions, and the phone numbers of where you will be staying and the phone number of an emergency contact. I know it’s been said many times, but cell phone numbers are not enough – they get turned off, batteries fail, or you’re in the back of the Canadian wilderness and out of cell phone reach. And your vet is not your emergency contact – they are your vet and that is all. It takes time – at least 20 minutes – so plan for that when you make your plane reservations – and sometimes there is someone ahead of you in the line at the kennels.

“To err is human, to forgive is canine” – Unknown –

HAVE YOU CONSIDERED A CRATE?

More dog owners are finding a crate a very useful piece of canine furniture. A crate can be your dog’s cave, bedroom, den, place of safety, even a dining room. Treasures can be stowed there, blankets mashed into the best position for a good sleep. A crate can be moved around so that at one time it might be in the bedroom, another in the kitchen while dinner is prepared, another next to a favorite chair during a television show. Sometimes the door might be shut and at others open. It is a great place from which to house train a dog new to the family since a dog will usually not mess his or her den. It can be used to transport a pet to the vet or to the boarding kennel where it can be used as his or her sleeping quarters. But the CRATE SHOULD NEVER BE USED AS A PRISON to which a misbehaving dog is sent.

FOOD FOR YOUR PET WHILE BOARDING

We feed a certain high end brand of both dog and cat food. But we have no objection to your bringing your own pet’s food. We don’t charge extra if you do that, and we much prefer that you do that. Boarding is stressful and stress can show up in our intestines. Giving your pet a new brand of pet food, even if it is our high–end brand, may upset his tummy. It is best to bring the food your pet is used to. Please bring enough for the time your pet will be here, and enough for two days more – he may get hungry. But in case there is some hold up in your return schedule, please let us know what brand of dog or cat food you are feeding and then if necessary we can buy a bag to see us over until you get back. We will of course keep an account of the cost and give you what has not been eaten.

It is also a good idea to give us the name of the medications you bring – in fact bring us the container so we know exactly what the dosage is if we have to call your vet about it. We have to follow the directions on the bottle.

“In order to keep a true perspective of one’s importance, Everyone should have a dog that will worship him and a cat that will ignore him.”

Dereke Bruce

 

Remember our Regular Client Service Hours

Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Check out time is 1 p.m Pets picked up after 1 p.m. will be charged for another night

Saturday 9 a.m. to 12 noon

Sunday OPEN EVENINGS ONLY – Pick up is 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. and Drop off 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.

We charge for the full day Sundays and Holiday Mondays

WE ARE CLOSED ALL DAY JULY FOURTH, THANKSGIVING, CHRISTMAS DAY AND NEW YEAR’S DAY

Labor Day and Memorial Day fall on Mondays and we are closed all day on those holidays, but open

5 p.m. to 7 p.m. just like Sundays and therefore we charge for the whole day.

PLEASE NOTE OUR POLICY OF ADVANCE DEPOSIT FOR RESERVATIONS FOR OUR BUSY TIMES

SAGEMOOR KENNELS LLC

FOR PEACE OF MIND BOARDING AND QUALITY GROOMING

7196 COLUMBIA RIVER ROAD, PASCO WA 99301

( 509)544–9682 www.sagemoor.com